eyecaging:

The Grain Tutorial by Dan LuVisi
curryuku:

foervraengd:

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…
Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.
I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.
Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.
I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something.” In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.
Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

For all of you who have been longing for ME to make a tutorial about clothes, I truly recommend you to read this post. Since it covers the area in clothing that many other tutorials never mention, clothing is more than just “drawing folds and wrinkles”, it’s about knowing how the design and the behavior of our bodies affect it.
So yeah.
Read this. Please. It’s so easy explained.

rebloging for future reffs

curryuku:

foervraengd:

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…

Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.

  • I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
  • The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
  • here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

imageimage

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.

Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

image

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

image

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.

I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something.” In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

image

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.

Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

For all of you who have been longing for ME to make a tutorial about clothes, I truly recommend you to read this post. Since it covers the area in clothing that many other tutorials never mention, clothing is more than just “drawing folds and wrinkles”, it’s about knowing how the design and the behavior of our bodies affect it.

So yeah.

Read this. Please. It’s so easy explained.

rebloging for future reffs

zoocanvas:

Animating and Drawing 4-Legged Animals
(Author Unknown)

makanidotdot:

image

i like necks a lot yeh lets talk about necks!!! u gotta know what’s going on in there to draw necks, here’s a fairly simple run down.

Also a lot (most all) of my anatomy knowledge comes from taking Scott Eaton’s anatomy for artists course.  If you have a chance/money to take it, it’s really great.  

mogiru:

pythoskeeps:

hookteeth:

junidoe:

In the spirit of Halloween, I made a list for a one-a-day gore challenge for the scariest month of the year, much like last year’s October Gore Art Challenge! Please tag #goretober for easy browsing (and perhaps #nsfw, #gore, and #blood as appropriate, for the viewers’ sake), and have fun!

1. Excessive Gashes/Lacerations2. Extra Limbs/Eyes/Etc3. Surgery4. Torture5. Amputation6. Cannibalism7. Gut Spill8. Ritualistic Sacrifice9. Monster Form10. Blood Bath11. Skewered12. Fire/Explosion Damage13. Decay14. Plant growth in body15. Emanciation16. Painful Transformation17. Backstabbed (literally or figuratively)18. Acid burn19. Toolbox Injuries/Robotic Parts/Prosthetics20. Parasite21. Manslaughter/Serial Killer22. Animal/beast wounds23. Nosebleed/Bruises/Minor Injury24. Post-Mortem examination25. Skeletal/Bones showing26. Crushed27. Possession/Corruption28. Sickness29. Distorted Body/Broken Bone30. Stitching31. You made it! Combine any 2-3 above!


Oooo this is good. I might try to do this one.

I’m doing Inktober anyway so hey why not

it’s time kids

mogiru:

pythoskeeps:

hookteeth:

junidoe:

In the spirit of Halloween, I made a list for a one-a-day gore challenge for the scariest month of the year, much like last year’s October Gore Art Challenge! Please tag #goretober for easy browsing (and perhaps #nsfw, #gore, and #blood as appropriate, for the viewers’ sake), and have fun!

1. Excessive Gashes/Lacerations
2. Extra Limbs/Eyes/Etc
3. Surgery
4. Torture
5. Amputation
6. Cannibalism
7. Gut Spill
8. Ritualistic Sacrifice
9. Monster Form
10. Blood Bath
11. Skewered
12. Fire/Explosion Damage
13. Decay
14. Plant growth in body
15. Emanciation
16. Painful Transformation
17. Backstabbed (literally or figuratively)
18. Acid burn
19. Toolbox Injuries/Robotic Parts/Prosthetics
20. Parasite
21. Manslaughter/Serial Killer
22. Animal/beast wounds
23. Nosebleed/Bruises/Minor Injury
24. Post-Mortem examination
25. Skeletal/Bones showing
26. Crushed
27. Possession/Corruption
28. Sickness
29. Distorted Body/Broken Bone
30. Stitching
31. You made it! Combine any 2-3 above!

Oooo this is good. I might try to do this one.

I’m doing Inktober anyway so hey why not

it’s time kids

supersonicart:

Craftsy’s “Drawing Facial Features” Online Class for 50% Off!

Sponsoring Supersonic this week is the phenomenal online art resource Craftsy who is offering one of their awesome online classes at 50% off, "Drawing Facial Features!"

"Drawing Facial Features" is an excellent class taught with HD videos along with other resources and materials that never expire, allowing you to return any time to further your skill or refresh your artistic memory. The class covers everything from the structure of the face all the way to creating realistic portraits. There were many years of my life that I wished something like Craftsy existed. Learning art would have been much easier.

Getting the 50% discount for "Drawing Facial Features" is really simple, just follow this link and sign in or register to get the discount!

Check it out!

This offer expires on October 7th, 2014 at 11:59PM, MT.

useful tools

bossies:

amazing custom water/light reference tool
http://www.madebyevan.com/webgl-water/

image

online perspective manager/maker
http://www33.atwiki.jp/kndy/pages/94.html

online photoshop
http://pixlr.com/editor/

samurottedge:

Since it was Munday, I decided to do a small art reference project for myself. And then I decided to make it public with the following notes.

From Left to Right, Top to Bottom:

What NOT to do (front):

  • Don’t chicken wing your arms! Although it might be easier to hold the rifle, you will make yourself a bigger target.
  • Don’t close your one eye! You will lose your depth perception, which is crucial when you are on the move, or are trying to determine how far away your target is
  • Don’t keep your legs haphazardly strewn about. You need to make sure you’re balanced!

What to do (front)

  • Keep both eyes open
  • Bend your elbows downwards and towards the ground to make yourself a smaller target
  • Bend your knees to control the gun’s recoil + be ready to move.

What NOT to do (side)

  • Don’t put the stock above your shoulder
  • Don’t lean back.
  • Both of the above reduce your control over the weapon and may result in a black eye, and the rifle flying backwards and out of your hands.

What to do (side)

  • Bury the stock of the rifle into the meaty part of your shoulder
  • Lean into the gun to keep the gun under control when the recoil of the gun kicks the gun upwards or to the side
  • Bend your knees slightly to lean forward, as well as make yourself a smaller target

Patrol/Relaxed Stance

  • The soldier is relaxed and is most likely moving around.
  • His eyes are searching for possible threats
  • His hands are still on the rifle, even if he has a sling on

Low Ready Stance

  • Possible threat has been detected
  • Entire body shifts towards threat direction
  • Stock is shouldered 
  • Eyes are focused on the possible target
  • Gun barrel is pointed in the target’s general direction, but not directly at the target.

Firing Stance

  • Immediate response
  • Soldier fires off shots while screaming to the other people in his team
  • "CONTACT!" or "THREAT!"