ziggyzagz:

sketchchump:

I was on the toilet with that last ask I answered so I decided to actually sit and try to help the best way I can. Anon, I’m still in an art rut especially with anatomy and I’m totally not the best with it, but let me link all of you to some things I like to look at on my spare time.
I don’t have any anatomy art books, so I wouldn’t know who to recommend, but I DO have a lot of youtube videos I watch. Here’s some that might prove usefeul::

  How to Draw: Foreshortening with the Coil Technique
How to draw twisting forms

How I sketch Poses

Force Drawing with Mike Matessi part 1 « fav

Force Drawning with Mike Matessi part 2 « fav

Gesture drawing with Chris Warner

Analytical Figure Drawing with Michael Hampton « fav

Michael Hampton part 2 «fav

How to Draw Gesture with Proko « fav

how to draw structure in the body with Proko « fav

How to draw from reference with Will Terrell  « fav


My favorite books that I have on hand to practice gestures/anatomy with ARE MY HOLY BIBLES.
This one has a wide variety of body types and therefore is my fav…the chubs….>:3

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The main idea to keep your gestures from looking stiff is to remember the line of action
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ALSO SERIOUSLY JUST GOOGLE ANYTHING from man butts to back to arms to head angles if you cannot sit in a figure drawing class like me. Here’s a short gif of my process to sketching a quick figure

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I’M STILL LEARNING MYSELF and it’s fun to practice with friends!! I also enjoy playing around with styles, majorly disney artists such as glen keane
Edit: Pixelovely is a good gesture drawing site

Many resources to help you DRAW THEM BUTTS

characterdesigninspiration:

The latest generator, the random demon maker! Complete with horns, wings, and (mostly) unappealing personality traits, you can make your own demon in varying degrees of non-human-ness.  

(Fun fact you can technically get my headcanon for demon!Dean on Supernatural [but that’s probably like a one in a million chance])

I LOVE DEMONS SO MUCH…….I have to draw them all immediately

I got scarred, abstract, ibex horns, mismatched, none, lion, inflicting illness, trickster.

eyecager:

Torsos tips from Anatomy for Sculptors

I have an Anatomy Intensive class on Torso’s-Front and Back this term so expect a lot of information relating to it being put up.

kelpls:

BUNS AND THIGHS to the person who wantd it rebloggable i added butts bc people kept asking me about butts omgf

simonist:

here are some bits from the psg art tutorial by Arne Niklas Jansson

it’s incredibly useful and very comprehensive so please, check it out!

img 1: sub-surface scattering

Sub-surface scattering - Strong light can penetrate the surface of some materials and bounce around, then exit again. This will increase the saturation and make the surface look illuminated from the inside. In the case with human skin, we sometimes see it on hard edges between light and shadow. 

img 2: layer passes

  • Feel volume and angle of the form.
  • Where is the light coming from?
  • Try to figure out if there are any shadows that might be falling on the surface.
  • Is there any reflected light (radiosity) that hits the surface?
  • What is the ambient color of the scene? (sorta like global reflected light.)
  • Any speculars. Is the surface gloss/wet and also angled so it reflects a light source, such as the sky?
  • The exposure level. Perhaps it’s so heavily lit that it becomes more than white? Perhaps it’s so dark that even the brightest spot is hidden in darkness.
  • Is there any fog in the way?
  • The texture of the surface.

Note that this mainly goes for realistic styles. A brushstroke should also look efficient and consistent with the rest of the painting and your color scheme choice. You might also have an idea or style which disallows certain colors or textures and puts priority on other things. However, even in a powerpuff girls illustration there’s simplified elements of realistic rendering. Don’t hide behind “it’s not apart of my style so I’m not gonna learn it”.

img 3: speculars

There’s really just one kind of light. It bounces. You can only see the light (photon) if it enters your eye. Light does two important things when it hits a surface. First, a part of it is absorbed. This is how colors are made. A red apple reflects mostly red wavelengths, the rest are absorbed and turned into heat or something. That’s why black stuff get so hot in the sun. Anyways, the reflected light bounce away differently depending on the surface. If the surface is bumpy it will bounce away sort of randomly, like a tennis ball that hits rocky terrain. If the surface is smooth it will bounce away in a predictable path. A mirror is very smooth so the light comes back undistorted, so we can see our reflection.

Note that all surfaces have speculars, because speculars is just reflected light. It’s just more broken up/diluted on dull surfaces.

img 4: radiosity

Here on earth we have lots of stuff around us that the light can bounce off, so things here are more or less lit from all angles. For example we have the sky which is like a dome shaped blue light source. Then theres the ground, walls and other surfaces. In space there’s basically just one light source, the sun. This is why the moon just has a lit and shadowed side, and looks kind of flat. If you looks carefully however, you can see earthlight on the shadow side of the moon, but it’s very weak. Then there’s starlight, which I guess is even weaker.

When light hits a surface and bounces, it also change color. If it hits another surface of the same color it bounced off, it will make that surface look even more saturated.

troy-artlog:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR ART LOOK NICE: Color Harmony by Trotroy

For all those artists out there who want to know more about color picking, here’s a belated Christmas gift to y’all!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINEOne of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.Normand

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Life Drawing Exercise: CONTOUR LINE

One of the most straight forward tip I have about Life Drawing. It kind of goes against what most life drawing instructors will tell you. The first thing you’ll hear is “Draw from the inside.” A contour line on a figure drawing is about the most superficial way to approach it BUT, it will help you tremendously at finding a clear silhouette. By the way, no one says you can’t slightly alter the silhouette you are looking at. If there’s a way to make it clearer or make a better statement, go for it. Drawing is about making decisions, not just copying what you’re seeing. The same way other techniques will help understand how the body functions, using a contour line as an exercise will help you find proportions, angles of the body and general appeal in your posing.

Normand

crackmccraigen:

Using my models as a basis our brilliant Art Director Alex Kirwan put together these informative and beautiful “Do’s and Don’ts” sheets for the artists working on the show.

yopatrick:

Some good tips about comic lettering from Nate Piekos of Blambot.com