supersonicart:

Craftsy’s “Drawing Facial Features” Online Class for 50% Off!

Sponsoring Supersonic this week is the phenomenal online art resource Craftsy who is offering one of their awesome online classes at 50% off, "Drawing Facial Features!"

"Drawing Facial Features" is an excellent class taught with HD videos along with other resources and materials that never expire, allowing you to return any time to further your skill or refresh your artistic memory. The class covers everything from the structure of the face all the way to creating realistic portraits. There were many years of my life that I wished something like Craftsy existed. Learning art would have been much easier.

Getting the 50% discount for "Drawing Facial Features" is really simple, just follow this link and sign in or register to get the discount!

Check it out!

This offer expires on October 7th, 2014 at 11:59PM, MT.

useful tools

bossies:

amazing custom water/light reference tool
http://www.madebyevan.com/webgl-water/

image

online perspective manager/maker
http://www33.atwiki.jp/kndy/pages/94.html

online photoshop
http://pixlr.com/editor/

samurottedge:

Since it was Munday, I decided to do a small art reference project for myself. And then I decided to make it public with the following notes.

From Left to Right, Top to Bottom:

What NOT to do (front):

  • Don’t chicken wing your arms! Although it might be easier to hold the rifle, you will make yourself a bigger target.
  • Don’t close your one eye! You will lose your depth perception, which is crucial when you are on the move, or are trying to determine how far away your target is
  • Don’t keep your legs haphazardly strewn about. You need to make sure you’re balanced!

What to do (front)

  • Keep both eyes open
  • Bend your elbows downwards and towards the ground to make yourself a smaller target
  • Bend your knees to control the gun’s recoil + be ready to move.

What NOT to do (side)

  • Don’t put the stock above your shoulder
  • Don’t lean back.
  • Both of the above reduce your control over the weapon and may result in a black eye, and the rifle flying backwards and out of your hands.

What to do (side)

  • Bury the stock of the rifle into the meaty part of your shoulder
  • Lean into the gun to keep the gun under control when the recoil of the gun kicks the gun upwards or to the side
  • Bend your knees slightly to lean forward, as well as make yourself a smaller target

Patrol/Relaxed Stance

  • The soldier is relaxed and is most likely moving around.
  • His eyes are searching for possible threats
  • His hands are still on the rifle, even if he has a sling on

Low Ready Stance

  • Possible threat has been detected
  • Entire body shifts towards threat direction
  • Stock is shouldered 
  • Eyes are focused on the possible target
  • Gun barrel is pointed in the target’s general direction, but not directly at the target.

Firing Stance

  • Immediate response
  • Soldier fires off shots while screaming to the other people in his team
  • "CONTACT!" or "THREAT!"

I think a good art exercise would be doing a digital illustration without using white, and one without using black.

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

jagzilla:

typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:



mirrepp:





Some harsh but very very true words





 When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.
"this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…"
"this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…"
"there is better stuff on later pages…"
It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.
But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”
You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.
This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 
Be proud.



 This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

 The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!

I would have to stress that you should not only eliminate this urge to shit talk your own work professionally, but as much as possible online as well. It’s important to attach as little negativity with your art piece as possible, especially on tumblr where both image and text get reblogged or otherwise shared a lot. It’s really, really hard to not have that kneejerk reaction every artist has, but it will help you feel better about your own art in the long run as well. Compliment your own art (doesn’t have to be in public), the parts you like about it and it will gradually improve your opinion of your own art.
"Yes, that arm might need some work, I’ll get more references next time! But dang! Look at that torso! I nailed this. I used to not be able to draw torsos in this angle, dayum.” Just trying to think of this as often as possible will gradually make you lose that habit of talking shit about your work to your peers or to employers. It will help you.

jagzilla:

typette:

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words


When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.


This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.


The piece of advice I got that helped me the most with this is; the people looking at your work be it your director or an HR person, trust them to know and see the good work there that you’ve become desensitized to. We all have rushed shots and stuff, they can see the polished diamond inside of a rock, it’s literally their job! So don’t fret too much!

I would have to stress that you should not only eliminate this urge to shit talk your own work professionally, but as much as possible online as well. It’s important to attach as little negativity with your art piece as possible, especially on tumblr where both image and text get reblogged or otherwise shared a lot. It’s really, really hard to not have that kneejerk reaction every artist has, but it will help you feel better about your own art in the long run as well. Compliment your own art (doesn’t have to be in public), the parts you like about it and it will gradually improve your opinion of your own art.

"Yes, that arm might need some work, I’ll get more references next time! But dang! Look at that torso! I nailed this. I used to not be able to draw torsos in this angle, dayum.” Just trying to think of this as often as possible will gradually make you lose that habit of talking shit about your work to your peers or to employers. It will help you.

anatomicalart:

fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn:

A wicked fuck-ton of human back references.

[From various sources]

[x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x] [x]

me: does this look better one pixel to the left or one pixel to the right
me: I can't decide between these two incredibly similar colors
me: should this be on overlay or soft light
me: 75% OR 74% OPACITY

kangarookevin:

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

Because legs are the hardest thing to draw for me. Seriously, I’ll have a character with an awesome upper torso, then spaghetti legs.